Tuesday, 19 August 2014

56' Kingfisher Royale Aft Cab.


Description:

This 2005 model is pure luxury with every conceivable extra available.

Powered by twin 715hp C-12 Cats.

The vessel boasts three double cabins, spa bath, state of the art electronics, engine management systems, bow and stern thrusters, water mater, air-con, and much more.

We proudly present this magnificent vessel for sale!

For a full comprehensive inventory please contact Brett Harvey Horizon Shores Boat Sales.

brett@horizonshoresboatsales.com.au
Reference:
1943BH
Location:
Woongoolba QLD
Region:
Queensland
Length:
56' - 17.06m
Hull Material:
GRP









38' Searay Sundancer - Price: AU $168,000

Description:

This cruiser presents in very good condition and is powered by twin Mercruiser MPI big blocks typical of Searay boats.

The list of extras is extensive: Raymarine radar, GOS, sounder, autohelm, radios, genset, air-conditioning, full camper covers, and new rear cockpit carpet.

This list goes on.

Priced to sell!

Contact Brett at Brett Harvey  brett@horizonshoresboatsales.com.au
Reference:
1924BH
Location:
Woongoolba QLD
Region:
Queensland
Length:
38' - 11.58m
Hull Material:
GRP









Monday, 18 August 2014

How to Test a Boat


If you think you've found the boat of your dreams, it’s time to test it !!




If you think you've found the boat of your dreams, it’s time to test it. Testing your boat is more
than just taking it for a test drive around the harbor. You should look at everything closely, as
a professional boat tester would.

Sometimes, it can be hard to tell a top quality boat from one that may have problems later on. To an untrained eye, both can look good on the surface.
When you start to break everything down and give it a careful inspection, you’ll be able to tell a great
boat from a not-so-great boat.

By opening up all doors and access plates, you can get great insight on the the construction of the
boat. You should also stick your head into the anchor locker of any boat you are considering to
buy, as if they've cut any corners you’ll normally be able to see it here.
Looking into the anchor locker also lets you look at the hull to deck joint. If there is light
coming from through, or if the fiberglass around the joint can be seen through, it normally means
the boat has poor construction.

When you buy a boat, you should put it through a rigorous visual inspection. It’s also equally
important to conduct a vigorous test on the water as well. A private seller or dealer will
normally want to stack the deck, ensuring that the boat will perform well.
Normally, this involves a near empty gas tank, no gear or extra passengers, and keeping the boat in sheltered water. Therefore, it’s up to you to insist on a more realistic test. Think of the test as an actual day out on the water,and you’ll find out if the boat is indeed something you should spend your money on.

During your water testing, you should determine if the boat performs well and meets all of your
expectations. You should determine if the boat travels at the right speeds, and whether or not it
is capable of doing everything that you plan to do with it after you buy it.

When test driving the boat, you should put it through all paces in open water, cutting waves at all angles. 
If you plan to test a saltwater boat, you should bring along a 5 gallon bucket and try throwing some water onboard. Any boat you plan to use offshore should quickly shed water through the scuppers. Some boats will pool water in the bow and drain slowly – which can be very dangerous in rough waters.

If a seller or dealer balks at the mention of any requests you have, simply find yourself another dealer or another boat. There are plenty of great quality boats available, ranging in prices. Make sure to check everything very carefully before you make any decisions.

Friday, 5 July 2013

Bare Boat Charters

Information On Bare-boat Charters – 

Helping You Get Started



Bareboat charters are yachts that you can rent and operate by yourself. If you are not experienced in handling a yacht, you can hire a captain to take over this job for you. The idea behind a bareboat charter is that you do not get any extras – just the bare boat. You have to supply your own food and entertainment and if you want toys for watersports you either have to bring your own or rent them. Most of the bareboat yachts are between 30 and 50 feet in length and you can choose bareboat charters using power, sailing or catamaran boats.
In order to book bareboat charters without hiring a captain, the yacht charter company will need to see proof that you can handle the yacht on your own. You will either have to show the bareboat yacht charter company proof of your experience in handling smaller or similar sized yachts or present a certificate from a boating course. For most yacht charters in the Caribbean, companies do not require certification, but it is a requirement in some parts of the world, such as Greece. If you do need to hire a captain, this is not included in the price of the charter and you have to pay the captain yourself.
There are bareboat charters that will allow you to book a one-way charter. This allows you to sail to a destination and leave the yacht there. This will cost you more because unless someone books a one-way bareboat yacht charter back from that destination the company has to find a way of getting the yacht back to home base. It is quite likely that it will be cheaper on you to charter the yacht for a few extra days and return it yourself.
You can make your booking for a bareboat yacht charter online. However, you will need to make at least a 25% deposit on the total cost of the charter and there are bareboat charters that require 50% of the total as a deposit. You will also receive a contract to sign and a sailing resume to complete from the yacht charter company. Most of the charter companies do accept credit cards, but there are some smaller companies that only accept check, cash or money order payments.
When you book bareboat charters you usually get just the yacht itself. Although some of the charter companies do include a dinghy in the cost, most of the Florida companies require that you rent the dinghy. Since this is a necessity, you have to allow for the extra cost. You won’t have any of the amenities that you are used to at home, such as a television or microwave. You will also have to supply your own linens, dishes, food and water. If you want to book one of the bareboat charters that will take you to another country, you do need to make sure you have your passport with you or you won’t be allowed to dock in the ports.

Saturday, 15 June 2013

FEATURED BOAT..2005 Regal Commodore 2860 - Price: AU $85,000 NOW REDUCED

Description

2005 Regal Commodore 2860 - Price: AU $85,000  NOW REDUCED


Description:

Family Boating at it's best !!

This beautiful vessel has all the extras including:

Navman GPS and sounder, Kenwood stereo system, 5kva genset, air con, TV, Nutra salt flushing system, Neutrasan toilet system, Quick Silver inflatable with Mercury outboard, S/S BBQ, and the list goes on.

Powered by twin V6 Volvos, this vessel is priced under value.
Reference:
1685BH
Location:
Woongoolba QLD
Region:
Queensland
Year:
2005
Length:
31' 9" - 9.67m
Hull Material:
GRP


 Brett Harvey: brett@horizonshoresboatsales.com.au










Friday, 29 March 2013

OUTBOARD MOTOR CARE 



It's easy to keep your outboard in tip-top shape, even if you're not a mechanic. A little TLC and preventive boat motor maintenance facilitates safe boating and can keep your motor running well and reliable for years to come. 

After Every Trip :


After every outing, flush out the engine. This doesn't just apply to salt water adventures, but to fresh water outings as well. Buy a set of "rabbit ears": two flexible rubber seals connected with a metal clamp. Slip the apparatus onto the lower unit where the water is picked up and attach a garden hose. Start up the engine and let the water pump do the rest. (Practice safe boating and remember to stay clear of the prop and make sure no one tries to shift the motor into gear.)

 While you're flushing the motor, check the water pump to make sure it has good water flow. Carefully put your finger through the stream of water. It may be warm, but it shouldn't be hot. If the output is not strong, you may have some debris stuck in the outflow tube. Immediately shut down the engine to prevent overheating and damage.

 Insert a small piece of wire into the flow tube and work it back and forth. Start the engine again and check the output. If that doesn't solve the problem, you may need a new water pump. After flushing the engine, disconnect the fuel line and allow the engine to burn all the fuel in the carburetor. Once you've finished the flushing and run the engine out of fuel, be sure to turn off the key and, if you have a battery switch, turn it off.

Take the engine cowling off and check for fuel or water leaks. If you find leaks, consult your safe boating mechanic. Wipe everything down and spray with an anti-corrosive like WD 40 or Quick-lube. Be sure to lubricate all the moving parts such as the shift and throttle cables, carburetor valves, etc. Replace the cowling and wipe it down. Keep a canvas or plastic cover on the engine between trips. Always use fresh fuel. At the end of the season, boat motor maintenance should include draining your tanks and taking the fuel to the proper recycling authority.


Regular Maintenance :


Periodically check the fuel line for cracks and worn spots. .Make sure the fuel primer bulb is not cracked and is pliable. .Make sure the fuel-line fittings seat properly and don't leak. .Check the clamps on the fuel line for rust or corrosion. .Check the fuel tanks for damage and corrosion. .Check the tank vent to make sure it aspirates properly. .Check regularly for water in the fuel.

 Content provided by BoatSafe.com

Thursday, 13 October 2011

Rules of The Sea ALL Boaties Need To Know !

International Boating Navigation Rules!

Everyone using our waterways should know the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea.

These Rules form the basis of safe navigation by dictating navigation rules, speed restrictions, lights and sound signals.
Navigation rules are often called Rules of the Road at Sea and apply to all boats. These rules give clear indication's about passing, approaching, giving way and overtaking to avoid collisions with other boats.


In General!


* keep a good lookout at all times, through sight and sound, and be ready to give way to other boats
* if you must give way, do it in good time and make a move that will be obvious to other boats
* power boats have to keep out of the way of sailing and fishing boats and those hampered by dredging and cable laying and so on
always follow the golden rule - 'look to the right, give way to the right, turn to the right and stay to the right.

Rivers and Channels!

A boat must always be navigated on the starboard side (right) of the river or chanel (oppposite to the road)

Approaching Head On To Other Boats!

Each boat alters course to starboard (right) and passes port to port (left). Always assume this is the case when passing another boat.

Power Driven Boats Crossing!

The boat approaching from the starboard (right hand) side has right of way. However, if the other boat does not give way, the boat with right of way must act to avoid a collision.


Overtaking!


Overtaking boats are required to keep out of the way of the boat being overtaken. This applies to both sail and power.

Sailing Boat and Power-Driven Boats!


Power usually gives way to sail. However, this does not always apply. Larger boats (for example, ferries or container ships) may have difficulty manoeuvering. Other boats should always use common sense and seamanship by giving them plenty of room.

Sailing Boats!

When two sailing boats have wind on different sides, the boat with the wind on the port (left) side gives way.
When both boats have wind on the same side, the boat to windward shall give way to the boat leeward.

Sound Signals!


All boat operators should be familiar with sound signals. They are mostly used by ships and larger vessels with restricted manoeuverability. Boats over 12 metres should carry sound signals, either horns or bells. Sound signals should also be used when visibility is restricted to alert other boats to their position.

* One short blast .... I am altering course to starboard (right)

* Two short blasts .... I am altering course to port (left)

* Three short blasts .... I am operating engines astern (reversing or stopping)

* Four or more short blasts .... alerting the other boat .... I am unsure of your course (often supplemented by light signals).

Lookout!


Most importantly, you must keep a good lookout at all times. By being aware of what is around you, it will be easier to see, hear and avoid possible dangers.

Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Buying a Boat, Things to Consider Before Making a Decision !!


Many people do not get the boat they want until about the third one they buy. The first boat usually is an all rounder and may quickly become a disappointment. The reason is that many people become single minded about the things they do in boats and an all rounder may not do those things well enough.


Starting out

One of the best starting points is to give yourself an apprenticeship - spend a lot of time in other people's boats and take your partner with you. This will let you:

Eliminate all the different prejudices that people have about boats and the equipment used.

Notice how different boats perform with changing weather, in varying conditions and with different loads.

Find out the activities you and your partner prefer and you'll refine your search for the ideal boat for the job.

Learn to gauge properties of a boat - for instance the balance between comfort at speed and stability at rest.

Understand your partner's boating wants may be different to yours, so look for a version of the all rounder.

With the type of boat in mind, your next major purchases include the motor and trailer. Beware of putting too low powered a motor on the boat.

Low power means the performance and economy will drop dramatically with increased loads; power trim, which helps you set the boat up for different conditions will not work well; you will lose flexibility - no casual skiing; and unexpected loads, like towing another boat could damage the motor.

Boating Industry Association dealers will advise you on a range of power to suit your boat and the job that you want it to do.



Buying secondhand


As with used cars, when you are buying privately you have less legal safeguards than when buying from a dealer. This means you need to take extra care, especially when assessing the condition of the motor. Unless you are a trained mechanic, it would pay for you to employ an expert to do an assessment.

When buying, dealers value the boat, motor and trailer separately, and this is a good system for the secondhand buyer to use. Even if the motor on offer is a write off, the boat may be a good enough deal to justify buying a new or good secondhand motor for it. Many dealers have rebuilt motors in stock, or near new motors traded in by commercial users.

Aluminium

Look for cracks where rails weld to decks; where the sides meet the keel; and with an inboard engine, at the engine mounts. Look for corrosion, though superficial powdering is not a problem, lots of white powder or deep pitting calls for an expert opinion.

Fibreglass

Apart from cosmetic wear and tear, look for signs of cracking from impact and structural failure. Near where flat surfaces meet stiffening - at chines, planing strakes and bulkheads. Look close to distinguish superficial cracks from deep ones. Hulls with repairs can be acceptable as the quality of repairs is the significant factor.


When buying a boat

Consider what the boat is to be used for - protected or offshore waters.
Consult a BIA (Boating Industry Association) member for advice. The BIA has a Code of Ethics which has been designed to protect you.

Acknowledge your level of boating skills and whether they are sufficient for the boat you plan to purchase.

Determine how many people will be carried for the size of boat safely.
Consider where the boat will be kept - anchorage, trailer, at home or in a marina.

Assess running costs, maintenance, storage, equipment and safety gear.

Determine your overall budget.

Contact Ken on Email: boatsqueensland@gmail.com to enquire about any of the boats displayed on this site.
Or call me on my mobile 0415 168 048

To view more boats we have for sale visit:
http://www.silverwaterboatsales.com.au/used-boats/

Wednesday, 6 July 2011

Buying a Boat, Things to Consider Before Making a Decision !!

Buying a boat

Many people do not get the boat they want until about the third one they buy. The first boat usually is an all rounder and may quickly become a disappointment. The reason is that many people become single minded about the things they do in boats and an all rounder may not do those things well enough.


Starting out

One of the best starting points is to give yourself an apprenticeship - spend a lot of time in other people's boats and take your partner with you. This will let you:

Eliminate all the different prejudices that people have about boats and the equipment used.

Notice how different boats perform with changing weather, in varying conditions and with different loads.

Find out the activities you and your partner prefer and you'll refine your search for the ideal boat for the job.

Learn to gauge properties of a boat - for instance the balance between comfort at speed and stability at rest.

Understand your partner's boating wants may be different to yours, so look for a version of the all rounder.

With the type of boat in mind, your next major purchases include the motor and trailer. Beware of putting too low powered a motor on the boat.

Low power means the performance and economy will drop dramatically with increased loads; power trim, which helps you set the boat up for different conditions will not work well; you will lose flexibility - no casual skiing; and unexpected loads, like towing another boat could damage the motor.

Boating Industry Association dealers will advise you on a range of power to suit your boat and the job that you want it to do.



Buying secondhand

As with used cars, when you are buying privately you have less legal safeguards than when buying from a dealer. This means you need to take extra care, especially when assessing the condition of the motor. Unless you are a trained mechanic, it would pay for you to employ an expert to do an assessment.

When buying, dealers value the boat, motor and trailer separately, and this is a good system for the secondhand buyer to use. Even if the motor on offer is a write off, the boat may be a good enough deal to justify buying a new or good secondhand motor for it. Many dealers have rebuilt motors in stock, or near new motors traded in by commercial users.

Aluminium

Look for cracks where rails weld to decks; where the sides meet the keel; and with an inboard engine, at the engine mounts. Look for corrosion, though superficial powdering is not a problem, lots of white powder or deep pitting calls for an expert opinion.

Fibreglass

Apart from cosmetic wear and tear, look for signs of cracking from impact and structural failure. Near where flat surfaces meet stiffening - at chines, planing strakes and bulkheads. Look close to distinguish superficial cracks from deep ones. Hulls with repairs can be acceptable as the quality of repairs is the significant factor.


When buying a boat

Consider what the boat is to be used for - protected or offshore waters.
Consult a BIA (Boating Industry Association) member for advice. The BIA has a Code of Ethics which has been designed to protect you.

Acknowledge your level of boating skills and whether they are sufficient for the boat you plan to purchase.

Determine how many people will be carried for the size of boat safely.
Consider where the boat will be kept - anchorage, trailer, at home or in a marina.

Assess running costs, maintenance, storage, equipment and safety gear.
Determine your overall budget.

Thursday, 23 June 2011

Boating Tips on Caring For Your Boat

Read through these tips to learn best practices for responsible boat maintenance and care. Not only will proper boat maintenance extend the life of your boat and reduce the need for costly repairs, but it also helps ensure boating safety for all those aboard.

Cleaning & Care

One of the keys to boat maintenance is also one of the simplest- wash your boat regularly. Not only does routine cleaning facilitate a more pleasant and organized environment, but it also goes a long way towards counteracting the long-term effects of environmental wear and tear. Routine waxing and use of anti-fouling paint can also help protect your boat from the elements. You may also want to consider using environmentally-safe products for your boat maintenance needs!

Checklists

There are a myriad of finer points to keep in mind when it comes to boat maintenance. The best way to ensure that you have all the bases covered is to follow a professional checklist. For in-depth checklists that include everything from boat motor maintenance and winterization to boat trailer maintenance, be sure to check out the other pages of this section.

Proper Mooring

One of the most common ways a boat can start to show scratches and damage is not only from when it’s in use- but from when it’s being docked. Make sure lines are securely fastened in place, neatly coiled, and do not show signs of breakage or wear.

Battery Care

Depending on the type of battery your boat uses, check to ensure that it is properly charged and that it has the correct fluid levels. Also be sure to keep your battery clean, as dampness and dirt can also drain your battery.

Routine Inspection

Proper boat maintenance means being actively involved in, and attuned to, all aspects of your vessel. This means keeping an eye out for everything from loose fittings to fraying ropes to any other areas of your boat that may need special attention or replacement. Many times, damages incurred to a boat could easily have been prevented by following a preventative boat maintenance routine.

Boat Motor Maintenance

Follow best practices for both inboard and outboard motor care. Be sure to flush your engine after every outing, and check everything from your fuel tanks to clamps on your fuel line for rust, damage or corrosion. Also be sure to check your oil both for correct levels as well as proper filtration and cleanliness. Last but not least, keep an eye on your engine’s cooling system to make sure it’s functioning correctly.


Winterization

Boat maintenance doesn’t only mean paying attention to your boat when you’re actively using it during the warm weather months- you also need to be sure to protect your boat through an effective winterization routine. Whether you’re able to store your boat in a climate controlled environment, or if you have to go with an in-water storage option, please visit our winterization page below for more in-depth guidelines.

Bilge Pumps

Another crucial aspect of boat maintenance is ensuring that your bilge pump is functioning properly. There’s much that can cause more irreparable damage to a boat that having it sink. In the event that you need to use your pump, you’ll also want to make sure that your battery system contains enough power to support running the pump for a prolonged period of time.

Electrical Components

Many boating failures occur as a result of corroded electrical systems, so keeping electrical components dry should be a regular part of your boat maintenance routine. Electrical fittings can be protected with a water-repellant, non-conductive grease or corrosion inhibitor.

Consider a Boat Cover

Making an investment in a boat cover can help keep your boat clean and free of a variety of contaminants that aren’t just related to dirt or water- falling leaves and bird droppings can also cause a lot of damage if left unchecked. A boat cover can also prevent UV rays from breaking down hoses or fading carpets and upholstery.

Stay in the Know

Last but not least, responsible boat maintenance means taking the time to familiarize yourself with all aspects of boat care. Consult your owner’s manual for in-depth guidelines. If you’re new to boating, your boat dealer may know of helpful boating instruction classes that deal specifically with your type of boat. Become comfortable with boating terms and definitions. And while it’s always important to take the time to learn how to do things yourself, also don’t be afraid to seek the help of a professional when needed.

Thursday, 16 June 2011

Protecting Your Boats Gelcoat

Protecting Your Boats Gelcoat Surface
Periodic preventative maintenance and good storage habits will
keep your fibreglass looking like new. Here are
a few important suggestions that will help you keep your gelcoat
surface in the best possible condition.

After each use, rinse the gelcoat surface with fresh
water. If a boat has been used in brackish or salt water, a
mild soap should be used in the wash-down.

Cover your product between uses with a cover such as
a tarpaulin to protect the finish from direct sun. Do not cover
with anything that will not allow moisture to evaporate.
Some products such as sheet plastic trap moisture against
the gelcoat surface.

Before storing, remove loose items (swim suits, boat
cushions, towels, etc.) which may come in contact with the
gelcoat surfaces. Discolouration and mildew could form if water
is trapped between these items and the gelcoat surface.

The Right Protection for Gelcoat finishes.

Waxing is recommended two to four times a year. If you are in a
climate where you use your product year-round, wax every three
months. If you have a seasonal use, wax at the beginning and end
of the use period.
Waxing helps protect your gelcoat surface from normal, common
elements. Use a wax recommended for gelcoat fibreglass
finishes.
Some recommendations are 3-M Liquid Wax #9026 or Mirror
Glaze Boat Cleaner Wax #50. Do not wax in direct sunlight.

Before using one of these waxes, check the label and closely follow the
manufacturer’s recommendations for application.

Occurrence of colour fading or yellowing.

Darker colours are more prone to fading because they absorb more
of the sun’s ultraviolet rays and retain heat. Whites and off-whites
may discolour or yellow with direct exposure to sunlight.

If your gelcoat finish has started to fade or discolour, and waxing
will not restore the original finish, compounding by hand with
3-M’s Fibreglass Restorer and 3-M’s Wax #9005 will remove oxidation
and chalking. Its blend of waxes will restore shine and retard
UV damage.

Compounding with Mirror Glaze Machine Cleaner #1, applied with
a low speed buffer will make quick work of large areas.
Never place a buffer in such a manner as to let the buffing pad
touch the ground. The pad will pick up dirt which can cause deep
scratches in the gelcoat finish.

After machine compounding, wash the surface using clean water
and then dry. Apply a good coat of wax. Do not apply compound or
wax in direct sunlight.

Removal of minor scratches.

If you have light surface scratches and compounding will not
remove them, wet sanding may be necessary.
To wet sand, first clean the area with soap and water.
Sand with 500 grit wet/dry sandpaper. You should also use a sanding
block.
When sanding, keep the surface wet and try to keep the area free
of dirt and dust. On vertical surfaces, pressing a wet sponge above
the sanding area will keep the surface wet.

Always keep the sanding block flat on the surface. Never use the
edge or corner as this will result in making scratches that compound
will not remove.

After wet sanding has been completed polish the sanded area with
3-M Fibreglass Restorer #9005 or for larger areas, use Mirror Glaze
Machine Cleaner #1 with a low speed buffer. Do not use hand rubbing
compound with a low speed machine buffer.

Several applications of compound may have to be applied before
all the scratches are removed. After compounding is completed,
wash the surface using clean water and then dry. Apply 3-M #9026
Liquid Wax. Do not apply compound or wax in direct sunlight.

Removing stains from gelcoat.

Stains may be removed by any number of Fibreglass and Plastic
Cleaners. Deep stains may require the removal of some of the
surface of the gelcoat by compounding or sanding. Always start by
using the least amount of abrasive to do the job. After the stain is
removed, wash the surface using clean water and then dry. Apply a
good coat of wax. Do not apply compound or wax in direct sunlight.

Wednesday, 15 June 2011

Torque V's Horsepower in Marine Engines

Issues To Consider When Re-powering your Boat !!

Marine Engine Torque Vs. Marine Engine Horsepower



GENERAL


When it comes to engine horsepower versus engine torque in marine engine applications, most people make the common mistake of focusing on the marine engine horsepower rather than the marine engine torque. When it comes to both gas marine engines as well as marine diesel engines, in most cases focus should be directed to the torque more so than the horsepower. There is a common saying with in the OEM industry that "Horsepower sells a boat however Torque is what actually moves it". This could not be closer to the truth! One should realize that horsepower is really a measure of the torque over a given period of time. This taken into account by the rpm variable in the specification. The following equation may help to shed some light as well.

Torque = Hp x 5252 / Rpm (5252 is a constant)


It is interesting to note that the formula also verifies the typical torque bell curve when the torque trails off as rpm increases at the top end. One may consider that engines making torque at a lower rpm tend to work better in marine applications due to the fact that "most" boats tend to plane in the range of 2,000 - 3,000 rpm. It's not by chance that most marine engine manufacturers continue using the larger displacement - lower rpm, cast iron marine engines because of this fact. Many people wonder why these manufacturers haven't changed over to the high rpm engines the automotive industry has been converting to over the past 10 years; for the same reason the LT-5 Corvette engine and Lexus V8 engines didn't work very well in these marine applications --- nice Hp but at higher rpm's and therefore poorer low rpm torque characteristics.

Another interesting item to note is that since the proper method for propping a boat is to select the size prop that allows the engine to turn at it's maximum allowable rpm. It is required that a similar level of torque be produced at the top rpm condition as well as the proper planing rpm for a given boat hull (draw a straight line across the torque bell curve and see at what "lower rpm" this takes place. If this is not the case the selected prop will over-load the engine at the boats planing rpm and therefore yield very sluggish low rpm performance characteristics. For example a high revving engine that makes 400 hp at 5500 rpm would be making about 382 Lb-Ft torque (using the above formula) at 5500 rpm, since it would have a maximum torque output at probably 4,000 rpm it would be likely not to produce enough torque at 2500 rpm to make the boat plane very well since the prop was selected based on the 382 Lb-Ft value. Notice the higher the rpm an engine makes it's torque the worse this situation becomes.

In contrast to this; large engines that make significant horsepower at "very" low rpm's will therefore make a tremendous amount of torque, but at extremely low rpm. For example a diesel marine engine that makes 300 Hp at 2,000 is making 788 Lb-Ft at this same rpm. Noting that the torque curve is generated in "bell form", and therefore the maximum torque could be as high as 900 Lb-ft on this 300 Hp engine. Comparing this against a 300 Hp GM small V8 engine that makes 300 Hp at 5,000 and 375 Lb-Ft torque at 3200 rpm, this is a considerable difference. Very low rpm diesel engines typically make tremendous low rpm torque and therefore require specific gear ratios not supported by sterndrives, as well as requiring much larger diameter prop shaft's.

APPLICATION


Now realizing the above facts one may ask how this can be applied to my specific boat or especially gas to diesel conversion re-power projects. Since overall boat speed is generated by a combination of prop speed and prop pitch (the horizontal distance traveled by a single propeller revolution - measured in inches. Ex 21P means 21 inches of travel with one revolution). For most mid-size boats (up to 40 feet) the best option is a higher revving diesel engine that generates torque at lower rpm. For example a diesel engine that produces 300 Hp at 3600 rpm and makes 500 Lb-Ft torque at approximately 1600 rpm will work out much better than the example above of the 300 Hp engine making it's power at only 2000 rpm.

BOTTOM LINE

When looking to re-power or especially when looking to convert from gas to diesel, spend more time comparing the torque rather than horsepower. For example when converting from the typical 330 Hp GM 454 engine to a "high rpm" 300 Hp diesel, the additional 100 Lb-Ft torque produced by the diesel will allow approximately 5-6 more sizes in prop pitch and therefore offset the 1,000 rpm given up with the diesel. With the typical 250 Hp small V8 gas engine, a "high rpm" 250 Hp diesel will yield approximately 100 Lb-Ft additional torque and therefore match up very nicely.

Friday, 20 May 2011

Sea Ranger 46 Aft Cab Cruiser - Price: AU $348,000 Featured Boat

Sea Ranger 46 Aft Cab Cruiser - Price: AU $295,000 HUGE PRICE REDUCTION


This is the kind of boat you'll tell your friends about. Its in immaculate condition for its age. Hard top over flybridge and cockpit with two davits and tender. This beauty will sleep nine adults in her three cabins. Ample refrigeration, full teak walk around decks. She is powered by economical twin 135hp Ford Lehmans with long range fuel tanks of 3600ltrs. This boat is capable of long range cruising.








Thursday, 12 May 2011

International Boating Navigation Rules!


Everyone using our waterways should know the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea.


These Rules form the basis of safe navigation by dictating navigation rules, speed restrictions, lights and sound signals.
Navigation rules are often called Rules of the Road at Sea and apply to all boats. These rules give clear indication's about passing, approaching, giving way and overtaking to avoid collisions with other boats.


In General!


* keep a good lookout at all times, through sight and sound, and be ready to give way to other boats
* if you must give way, do it in good time and make a move that will be obvious to other boats
* power boats have to keep out of the way of sailing and fishing boats and those hampered by dredging and cable laying and so on
always follow the golden rule - 'look to the right, give way to the right, turn to the right and stay to the right.

Rivers and Channels!


A boat must always be navigated on the starboard side (right) of the river or chanel (oppposite to the road)

Approaching Head On To Other Boats!


Each boat alters course to starboard (right) and passes port to port (left). Always assume this is the case when passing another boat.

Power Driven Boats Crossing!


The boat approaching from the starboard (right hand) side has right of way. However, if the other boat does not give way, the boat with right of way must act to avoid a collision.


Overtaking!


Overtaking boats are required to keep out of the way of the boat being overtaken. This applies to both sail and power.

Sailing Boat and Power-Driven Boats!


Power usually gives way to sail. However, this does not always apply. Larger boats (for example, ferries or container ships) may have difficulty manoeuvering. Other boats should always use common sense and seamanship by giving them plenty of room.

Sailing Boats!


When two sailing boats have wind on different sides, the boat with the wind on the port (left) side gives way.
When both boats have wind on the same side, the boat to windward shall give way to the boat leeward.

Sound Signals!


All boat operators should be familiar with sound signals. They are mostly used by ships and larger vessels with restricted manoeuverability. Boats over 12 metres should carry sound signals, either horns or bells. Sound signals should also be used when visibility is restricted to alert other boats to their position.

* One short blast .... I am altering course to starboard (right)

* Two short blasts .... I am altering course to port (left)

* Three short blasts .... I am operating engines astern (reversing or stopping)

* Four or more short blasts .... alerting the other boat .... I am unsure of your course (often supplemented by light signals).

Lookout!


Most importantly, you must keep a good lookout at all times. By being aware of what is around you, it will be easier to see, hear and avoid possible dangers.

Tuesday, 26 April 2011

Boat Trim - Who Said You Don't Know Squat !!

Boat Trim
Understanding boat trim and boat squat are all about control and avoiding running aground. For a “planing boat”, i.e., those boats we’re most familiar with that buzz around the bays and creeks, usually with an outboard engine on the stern, that “climb up” on to the water as they go faster, trim is synonymous with every aspect of the boat. Whether it be at the dock, barely making way or operating “at speed”, how ‘flat’ she is largely under the control of the skipper and he or she should be constantly aware of what trim they are assuming. This trim is best controlled by what angle you place the outboard engine relative to the transom. Huh?




Figure 1 – courtesy of the USCG Auxiliary

Usually in the throttle, there is a thumb control that when you press it “down”, it brings the propeller in closer to the transom. See figure 1.
By bringing the propeller in closer to the transom, you force the bow down from its manufactured water-line. When you would want to do that?

How about if you were heading into strong wave action? If your bow was trimmed ‘up’, the force of the waves would accentuate that, possibly making it more difficult to see – and to control the boat. (see Six Tips to Surviving a Storm at Sea)





Figure 2 - courtesy of the USCG Auxiliary
Commensurately, if you press the thumb control to bring the engine “up”, it moves the propeller away from the transom, forcing the bow up from its manufactured water-line.

Why would you do that? Well, there are a number of reasons. One reason is that a powered vessel’s fuel consumption improves as you reduce its wetted surface. (See Fuel Efficiency on the Water)

So, as you are cruising down the bay, you can trim the engine up and save fuel at a given rate of speed. Secondly, if you are willing to throw fuel efficiency to the wind, sort to speak, a powered vessel simply goes faster with less of a wetted surface. And, as you bring the bow up, you reduce the wetted (in the water) surface. Compare how much more of figure 1 is below the water line, versus figure 2.

Boat Squat
Unless you are driving one of those “battlewagons” out there, or are involved in commercial navigation, you’ve probably never heard of “boat squat.” Even if you are in those situations, you still may not have heard of it – and it is critical to understanding why a boat with 4’ of draft hits the bottom in 5’ of water…
When any boat is making way through the water, she starts by pushing a large amount of water ahead of her. If she a planing vessel, she’ll climb up on that wave as she picks up sufficient speed. But if she is a “big ‘un”, she won’t be planing anytime in this lifetime. She is a displacement vessel. So, this water that is getting pushed ahead returns to the side and under the boat’s bottom. As she starts to put on some way (speed), imagine this cycle of water building up speed under the ship. This causes a drop in water pressure under the boat. This causes the ship to vertically drop in the water. This is “boat squat” and how a boat with 4’ of draft hits the bottom in 5’ of water. (Hint: go slow in shallow water, Big ‘Un.)

Now, for a displacement vessel, trim is different from squat. Trim is the difference of the forward and aft draft while the boat is stationary. As she gets underway and her aspect to her water lines changes, she is affecting “squat.” Naval architects justifiably worry about whether she has forward or aft “squat” (leans forward or aft as she builds speed.) This is largely determined by her center of gravity and her “block coefficient”, which is the volume of the hull (V) divided by the Length of her Water Line (LWL) times the (maximum) Beam of her Water Line (BWL) times her Draft. If you draw a box around the submerged part of the ship, it is the ratio of the box volume occupied by the ship.

So, now, you can say that you do know squat…!

* a “slow bell” means making way at the minimum speed at which the boat can maintain steerage. Larger boats, with exposure to the wind, need more speed to maintain steerage than a smaller, low profile boat.


Posted by Daily Boater
Labels: Boating Tips, Guest Blog, USCG Auxiliary

Tuesday, 19 April 2011

Outboard Maintenance

It’s no surprise that outboard engine maintenance is a hot topic. Who wants to be stranded offshore or deep in the outback with a mechanical issue that could have easily been avoided with only a bit of preventative maintenance? With just a little TLC and responsible practices you can keep your outboard engine(s) running reliably and smoothly for many years to come.

If you’ve recently purchased a new outboard motor—for approximately the same price you could have purchased a new car—it’s in your best interest to make it last. Although pricey, the benefit of new-age outboard engines is that they offer technologically advanced designs and feature cutting-edge engineering, ensuring they will perform as expected for the term of your vessel ownership—if not longer. However, one downside to modern engineering is that the latest electronically controlled systems are quite complex and if you neglect them in any way, you may be in for an unpleasant surprise.

With the latest and greatest outboard engines, manufacturers have employed a wide variety of technologies and design features in an effort to improve performance and reliability, while simultaneously increasing fuel economy and lowering emissions. You can count on one thing—whether it’s an electronic fuel injected four-stroke, carbureted four-stroke, single-point fuel injected two-stroke, low pressure direct injection or high pressure direct injection two-stroke, modern outboard motors are not designed for owner maintenance. If you’re not a certified, factory trained technician, it is in your best interest to leave the tough task of performing annual service to someone with years of experience.

For many boaters around the country winterizing is a hot topic, but for those who ply their craft in the temperate, sub-tropical climate of Queensland, it’s clear that the boating and fishing season never ends. With that being said, it’s still best to perform your annual maintenance during the winter season. This is due to the fact that boatyards and mechanics won’t be as busy and any issues that arise during your annual service can be handled promptly.

While many boaters follow the “When it breaks, I’ll fix it” mentality, this is not a good idea and will surely reduce the reliability and efficiency of your outboard(s). According to Lund, approximately 50-percent of damaged motors that come through his shop are a result of lack of maintenance. Talk to distinguished mechanics around the state and they will likely sing you the same song. Regardless of the hours accumulated, annual service should never be neglected. Many boaters think that an annual service and 100-hour service are interchangeable terms, but this is far from the truth. Contact your manufacturer or local mechanic and see what service plan is best for you.
While you may think of yourself as handy and slightly educated in outboards, that’s fine and dandy, but professional technicians will be able to locate and troubleshoot certain components and aspects that could lead to trouble down the road if not taken care of immediately. If you’re confident in your abilities, changing your own oil will certainly cut costs when it comes to annual service, however, replacing an impeller or checking a thermostat is a different story altogether. Lets say for example your thermostat is stuck half-open. This will cause your engine to idle a bit cooler, but that’s pretty much the only warning signal you’ll receive. You will have no idea that your engine is running richer, effectively diminishing your outboard’s overall efficiency. Another component you may visually inspect and come to the conclusion that everything is okay is your sacrificial zinc anode. While a seasoned zinc and a brand new zinc may look the same, the used zinc will weigh significantly less and lack the integrity to perform effectively.

When it comes to outboard maintenance with today’s technologically advanced motors one thing is for certain; seasons of neglect will lead to major expenses. The bottom line is that you should have your outboard(s) serviced annually by a certified technician. Don’t find yourself saying, “If I only would have…”

Annual Service Checklist:

• Perform Compression Test
• Replace Spark Plug(s)
• Inspect Thermostat
• Replace Fuel Filters
• Replace Engine Oil Filter
• Replace Lower Unit Oil & Inspect For Water in Lower Unit
• Pressure Test Lower Unit
• Install New Water Pump
• Remove Prop & Inspect Seal
• Replace Zincs
• Grease Fittings, Prop Shaft, Drive Shaft, Trim Steering
• Inspect Popit Valves
• Protect w/ CRC Corrosion Block
• Perform Vital Systems Check
• Inspect Steering Components

Monday, 18 April 2011

South Stradbroke Island

Visiting South Stradbroke Island.

Many people visit South Stradbroke Island by various styles of boat, from your small tinnie to the larger Sports Cruisers and luxury yachts.

Another great alternative is to stay on a houseboat anchored in the shelter of the island.

From the surf beach during whale watching season you can catch glimpses of the majestic humpback whales migrating north to breed and have their calves.



This part of the east coast of Australia is the only place in the world where you can see whales going in both directions at the same time when the early migrators return with their calves.
Whale migration starts in June and runs through to late October early November.

Things To See and Do on South Stradbroke Island Australia

Jumpinpin - also incorrectly known as Jumpin Pin and Jumping Pin. This area is great for fishing or to anchor up and enjoy the beautiful beach and sand - however, the Jumpinpin Bar can be quiet treacherous so beware if you don't know the area or are inexperienced on the water.

Surf Beach - 22kms of surf beach. Privately patrolled flagged area near Couran Cove Island Resort. Pristine beach with hardly a soul in sight. Beware of the 4WD and tractor tours though!

Whale Watching - mid-June to late October is the main season.

Sand Tobogganing or Sand Sledding - take your boogie board and toboggan down a massive sand dune. On ocean beach side approximately in line with Couran Cove Island Resort.

Serious sand sledding at South Stradbroke Island


Bushwalking – best to do this with a guide especially if you are inexperienced. A local will be able to guide you and tell you all there is to know about the area and local flora and fauna.

Fishing – fishing off boats on the eastern broadwater side you will typically find estuary fish such as bream, flathead, luderkick, tailor, whiting and jewfish. Occassionally you may be lucky and find the larger mangrove jack or trevally. There are also bountiful sandcrabs to be had. Resorts such as Couran Cove have fishing guides to help you with general fishing information and local fishing tips. They also arrange fishing trips to take you to the best spots!

Beach Walking - you can walk along the 22kms of surf beach with spectacular views to the north and south, back to the Gold Coast seaway.
Water Sunrises and Sunsets - Watch the sun rise over the water in the east and sun set over the water in the west. This is one of the few places you can see this on the east coast of Australia!



Spot the Golden Wallaby - this rare wallaby is only found in this area, spotting one can be a real treat.

Water sports - surrounded by water, it makes sense that resorts provide access to water activities (at an additional cost) such as jetskiing, parasailing, diving, sea kayaking, sailing, surfing, windsurfing, fishing trips and boat tours.

Tuesday, 12 April 2011

Buying a Boat

1. What will I use the boat for?

Cruising? Fishing? Diving? Waterskiing? River, lakes, coastal or offshore? Perhaps you will use the boat just for family fun with multi-purpose use. Or maybe you want to get into some serious off-shore fishing?

The purpose of your boat will help determine the type of hull you will need. There are many different hull designs, including a sleek low profile for wakeboat boats, deep-hulled designs for offshore boats, flat-hulled aluminium punts for fly-fishing or multi-hulls for excellent stability at rest.

Once you have determined what you'll be using your boat for, your BIA dealer will help you exlpore the range of hulls to choose the best type for your needs.

2. Where do I plan to store or moor my boat?

When you consider this question, you need to think about the height, overall length including trailer, access in and out of storage and security from theft. These factors will limit the size of your boat. Don't forget that there are safe, secure, dry-land facilities available at a number of marinas within close proximity of launching facilities. In addition, many marinas currently offer excellent mooring facilities.


3. Who is going to operate and handle my boat?

Boats come in many different weight and power ratios. You need to consider the conditions of the launching facility you will generally use, the strength and number of people who will assist with launching and retrieval, and also the size and type of vehicle that will be towing the boat.

You will also need to consider the experience of the operator. A boat that is too much to handle will soon put you off the pleasure of getting out on the water. Your BIA dealer will advise you on a boat package that suits your experience, as well as recommending aids, such as drive-on trailers, electric winches and 'boat nabbers' that will assist with launching and retrieval.

4. What is my budget?

There are new boats available to suit all budgets. New technologies offer added efficiencies and many pay special attention to comfort and interior design, making family boating more pleasurable than ever.

The used-boat market also offers some excellent rigs, many with a range of extras. Additionally, consider used accessories, extras and options that can update and improve your preferred boating package. The advantage of buying used goods through an accredited BIA dealer is that basic warranties apply, and these will be honoured. The risk of buying privately is that you may be caught with a 'lemon', or worse still, a stolen boat, with little recourse and a big bill to pay.